What is High-Risk Life Insurance

There are a number of factors that go into creating an individualized life insurance policy, including the policyholder’s age, social habits, past medical history, and health risks. An insurance company will weigh all of these aspects to determine if it wants to insure the individual and, if so, at which rate. Most people have no problem being accepted into a plan but others may face challenges because of their histories or lifestyles that means they have to consider high-risk life insurance. So, just what is high-risk life insurance? What is High-Risk Life Insurance? This term refers to a policy assigned to someone deemed a high risk. Several factors can influence this determination, such as whether the person has a dangerous job or hobby, has a history of risky habits or has been diagnosed with a serious illness. For instance, an occupation such as a firefighter may put someone into the high-risk category, as insurance companies evaluate both the rates of death and injury for such an occupation as well as the company’s own history of insuring people who work in this field. A hobby such as skydiving is another activity that could mean the person has to invest in high-risk insurance. Smoking is one of the most common high-risk habits and one that many people attempt to kick before applying for insurance; typically, most insurance companies will offer a lower rate to applicants once they’ve been smoke-free for at least a year. High-risk diseases are those considered the most serious and life-threatening. For instance, asthma or controlled anxiety or depression shouldn’t affect a person’s ability to get insurance, but...

Scholarships for Students with Cancer

Cancer can be a financial drain—no matter the age of the patient. When a young person is facing cancer, his or her financial future may especially be impacted, as younger patients are less likely than older people to have savings or to even have insurance. Many young people battling cancer may even decide to change education plans because of fears over finances; however, thankfully, there are many scholarships for students with cancer that can enable them to continue to seek higher education all while getting back on the path to good health. Nearly all college-bound individuals seek financial support, as education costs continue to skyrocket—and, as costs for cancer rise just as quickly, that has paved the way for scholarships for students with cancer. Scholarship eligibility varies, but most require the student to submit medical documentation of a past or current diagnosis, and some may also take income and other factors into account. If you’re looking for scholarships for students with cancer, here are two good places to start: Cancer for College This national organization has provided more than $3.5 million in scholarships to nearly 1,400 cancer survivors, including $500,000 last year alone. It offers one-time scholarships of up to $5,000 to college, community college and graduate students. Applications are accepted Nov. 1-Jan. 31 every year, and students can also opt to apply for 10 specialized scholarships, which focus on certain geographic areas, college majors and schools. National Collegiate Cancer Foundation Every March, NCCF begins accepting applications for two separate scholarship programs, each of which provide $1,000 awards. The Survivor Scholarship Program is for students ages 18-35 who are...

Exercising After Cancer Treatment

Common side effects of cancer treatments, such as fatigue, nausea, and dizziness, can sideline patients from their daily activities, such as childcare, work, and household responsibilities. However, one aspect of daily life that isn’t often addressed but is certainly disrupted by cancer treatment is exercise. Whether the patient is an avid runner or simply enjoys a walk through the neighborhood with the dog, activity level significantly decreases during cancer treatments, which can have both physical and mental impacts on the patient. Low-Impact Exercise During Chemotherapy Exercise during chemotherapy and other treatments is possible, but it’s important that patients consult with their physicians before undertaking any exercise regimens. Exercise has been shown to reduce fatigue, but patients should be conscious of the side effects they’ve experienced from their treatments and cautious not to overexert themselves. The best exercise for cancer patients during chemo and other therapies is low-impact, such as short walks—whether they’re around the healthcare facility, in the house or just across the street. Patients should set and celebrate small goals and take their time, remembering that they may eventually return to the same level of exercise they had achieved prior to their diagnosis, but that will take time. Start with a Walk – Exercise After Cancer Treatment Getting back to exercise after cancer treatment is also an incremental process. Again, patients should first consult with their doctors to come up with the most appropriate exercise plan, as it should take into account side effects of medications, past treatments and ongoing risks. Walking is one of the best places to start—a 15-minute walk has been shown to improve energy...

5 Facts About Cervical Cancer

Throughout the year, we mark different months in tribute to certain types of cancer—remembering those lost to the disease and the ongoing efforts to fight its spread, as well as raising awareness about risk factors and preventative measures. In January, attention turns to cervical cancer, a serious form of the disease that affects women of all ages around the world. In honor of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, it’s important not to just learn about the condition but to use that information to take actionable steps to reduce your own risk or share what you’ve learned to educate others. So, here are five facts to raise your own cervical cancer awareness and help you and your loved ones stay protected and proactive: Cervical cancer is the third most common type of cancer for women across all age groups, though it is most frequently seen in women over 30. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are connected to untreated human papillomavirus, a sexually transmitted disease. It’s estimated that nearly half of sexually active adults will have HPV at some point in their lives. Mortality rates of cervical cancer are on the decline, thanks in large part to the emergence of an HPV vaccine and more advanced Pap screening tests. Cervical cancer often causes no symptoms in its earliest stages, which is why it’s referred to as the “silent killer.” Later-stage symptoms include vaginal bleeding. In addition to HPV, there are a number of risk factors for cervical cancer, including longtime use of birth control pills, smoking, having given birth more than three times, having many sexual partners, and being positive for...

What is an Accelerated Death Benefit Rider?

An accelerated death benefit generally enables policyholders who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness to draw cash advances against the value of the death benefit. There are several common types of death benefit riders. The purpose of death benefit riders is to give an individual access to the cash value of his or her insurance plan while he or she is still alive. Another option is the enhanced death benefit, which pays out the highest investment gain the policy attained, even if the market value is less. Those with a variable annuity death benefit may be able to attach riders to enable cash advances and a payout that is higher than the minimum.  Pros and Cons of Death Benefit Riders Life insurance is traditionally understood as helping people plan and prepare for the end of their lives. Many policyholders aim to use the amount of their plan to help beneficiaries pay for things like funeral costs, to settle final arrangements or to help reduce debt once they have passed. However, after a lifelong investment, they should be able to use the value whenever they need it and, that’s where a death benefit rider may come in. People with a terminal illness may be able to convert their life insurance policy to cash. Death benefit riders can help policyholders customize a plan that makes sense for them; however, there are some factors to consider. Riders do increase the cost of a plan, which could be a serious consideration for some individuals. Plans that enable policyholders to draw on the value while they’re still alive also come with some drawbacks,...