June 2016 - Life Credit Company

New Pink Commemorative Coin Will Raise Breast Cancer Awareness

From car windows to front yards, the color pink has been splashed across countless surfaces to raise awareness for breast cancer. Now, that effort will have a new home — right in the pockets of Americans. A series of pink-hued coins is expected to be released in 2018. The U.S. Mint will produce 50,000 $5 coins, which will be tinged with pink, as well as 400,000 $1 coins and 750,000 half-dollar coins with symbols to reflect the fight against breast cancer. A national contest will be held to pick the artwork for the coins. The effort is meant to raise awareness for cancer patients battling the illness and the larger effort to combat new diagnoses. It also is designed to raise needed funds for the fight against breast cancer. A portion of the proceeds of coin sales will be donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. The production of the coins would be covered by the sales price. The idea was conceived of by New York Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, who led legislation, known as the Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coin Act, that called for the creation of the coins, which President Obama ultimately signed. In an interview with the Associated Press, Maloney cited the startling statistics about breast cancer: About one in eight women will develop the disease in their lifetime. “The only obstacle standing between us and a cure is further research, and that research needs funding,” Maloney said. “The funds raised through coin sales could be the ones that lead to the discovery of a cure to this devastating disease.” While breast cancer remains the most common...

OncoLink is an Award-Winning Resource For Cancer Patients

If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop resource for cancer patients, look no further than OncoLink. From educational information for people who are newly diagnosed to support for those going through treatments to community-building efforts for survivors, OncoLink addresses all aspects of the cancer journey. A strong history OncoLink traces its roots back more than two decades. It was started in 1994 by Dr. Joel Goldwein of the University of Pennsylvania, and holds the distinction as the very first comprehensive website offering cancer information. The concept of gathering medical information online was novel at the time; there were just 30,000 web pages available then, compared to the approximately 1 billion now. As technology has evolved, the website has undergone many transformations; it began largely as a way to connect cancer patients to other sources of information but over time started publishing original content. The material itself gradually diversified, with content generated by everyone from doctors to nurses to social workers to patients themselves. Despite its evolution, OncoLink has remained committed to its original stated goal: “to support patients, caregivers and practitioners through education.” Material for all users            Education is everywhere on OncoLink. On the home page, visitors have the option of researching by cancer type — with two-dozen pages on different types of the disease. On each page, users can access in-depth information about treatment options, prevention, screening, and support. The pages are also sorted according to who’s seeking the information: patients or healthcare professionals. Patients can learn about the latest in treatments, from chemotherapy to proton therapy to vaccine therapy. The information is presented in...

RB-World App Connects Cancer Patients With Online Support

Today’s youth are typically well-versed in technology — a reality that is helping young cancer patients. Web and mobile applications are increasingly used for information sharing, and such technology is also now being relied on for people seeking emotional support. With just a few clicks, people all over the world can connect, share stories, and find much-needed solidarity. One organization pursuing such a strategy is The Children’s Eye Cancer Foundation, based in Germany. Its new app, RB-World, provides online help for cancer patients, specifically those battling retinoblastoma. The disease originates in the retinal region in the eye and most commonly develops in childhood. For that reason, RB-World is open to patients and survivors as young as 12. The free app allows users to instantly connect with other people who’ve been diagnosed with retinoblastoma. While they can share medical advice and information, the app largely encourages users to share stories. Isolation can be a very real risk after a cancer diagnosis; a patient may feel like no one in his or her life can relate to the fears and frustrations that cancer can bring on a daily basis. With RB-World, however, patients have instant access to a sea of people who’ve faced the same challenges as them. The app functions as a virtual support group. In-person groups may be intimidating for some patients, but this app provides the benefits of such groups in a comfortable online space. RB-World organizers tout both the safety and accessibility of the app. All information users input is SSL-encrypted, which means privacy won’t be violated. Users have to register through a unique invitation code, and...